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BMW Art Car Collection. Ernst Fuchs. (1982)
 
 
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  • 1. Studio shots
  • 2. Portrait Ernst Fuchs. Natural Sound Interview in German
  • 3. Cutaways Portrait
  • 4. Interview Ernst Fuchs Natural Sound Interview in German
  • 5. St. Egid Parish Church Klagenfurt, Austria
  • 6. Dr. Cornelia Eibl - Curator Ernst Fuchs Retrospective. Natural Sound Interview in German
  • 7. Studio Effects


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Footage contains 7 Scenes:
Thu Jan 19 00:00:00 CET 2006 | ID: PF0002493
  •  
    #1: Studio shots
  •  
    #2: Portrait Ernst Fuchs. Natural Sound Interview in German
  •  
    #3: Cutaways Portrait
  •  
    #4: Interview Ernst Fuchs Natural Sound Interview in German
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    #5: St. Egid Parish Church Klagenfurt, Austria
  •  
    #6: Dr. Cornelia Eibl - Curator Ernst Fuchs Retrospective. Natural Sound Interview in German
  •  
    #7: Studio Effects
  •  
    #1: Studio shots
  •  
    #2: Portrait Ernst Fuchs. Natural Sound Interview in German
  •  
    #3: Cutaways Portrait
  •  
    #4: Interview Ernst Fuchs Natural Sound Interview in German
  •  
    #5: St. Egid Parish Church Klagenfurt, Austria
  •  
    #6: Dr. Cornelia Eibl - Curator Ernst Fuchs Retrospective. Natural Sound Interview in German
  •  
    #7: Studio Effects
 
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Studio shots
Scene 1 of 7, 06:52 min, Quicktime H264 16Mbit, 4:3, 720x576
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Dollyshots driver sidet of the BMW 635 CSi . Close ups and details. Crane shots of the hood. Long shot from above. Shots front of the car; doors and hood opened. Stop trick. Long shot driver side, passenger side. Dolly shots and stills passenger side. Shots back of the car, signature. Close up car rolls out of frame.
Portrait Ernst Fuchs. Natural Sound Interview in German
Scene 2 of 7, 09:43 min, Quicktime H264 16Mbit, 4:3, 720x576
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Q: You did many large-sized paintings. Is greatness an important theme for you? “It’s true. I already did monumental paintings at the age of 14 or 15. I painted on cardboard. That was during World War II. Between 1943 and 1945, there were many larger-than-life pieces of cardboard around. Later, I would re-use them as heating material. The whole thing wasn’t quite that important to me then. As a young person, you tend to constantly self-destruct and self-construct. That’s just a fact of life. Shame really. Some of these things have remained. But all of this shows my personal preference of monumental formats and also of religious themes. This first phase of my work has always been at the centre of my entire life’s work – in addition to hundreds of smaller paintings, which you could describe as “easel paintings”, i.e. things which can be moved around. The large paintings have always been created for museums and not for some kind of collective sale.” Q: You are one of the founders of the so called “Vienna school of Fantastic Realism”: Fantastic Realism” – and especially the “Vienna School” – has always enjoyed huge international recognition, up until the present. It has many very young fans all over the world. It’s a phenomenon which is ignored with a vengeance by heads of museums, because it’s an extremely figurative type of painting and also literature-oriented. Hence, it does NOT contain all the elements of “l’art pour l’art”, i.e. abstractness, which is constantly advertised as “art”. All these works basically make no sense. On the occasion of the ”Documenta” fair, big books are written to make sense of it all. These books try to make sense of this nonsense – at least, that’s what it is to me. Q: You are quoted as saying that art has no more moral commitment? “The reduction of painting to having a purely decorative function, even if it’s understood as an ideological signal, is characterless. People try to find the easy way out. The moral obligation is, first and foremost, to somehow feel a mandatory attachment to the highest performance of art, as we can judge it. I can’t say that the piano I have treated like, say, John Cage, personifies the kind of progress everybody’s talking about. What about talent which creates things that really moves us deeply? That is all formalistic and much ado about nothing, which cannot be justified by the term “progress” quite that easily. That is no motivation.” Q: You keep referring to the great old masters. Do you think there is still “Great Art” these days? If it were so easy in the arts to create something significant…well, then we should be able to see more of it than we do. Thus, it is NOT quite that easy. Even in the 16th and 17th century, there were artists dedicated to decorative art only, which is proliferating specialization. And today, you won’t even find qualified stucco workers. Maybe you’ll find some in Eastern Europe, but over here, all the fine arts have become extinct. Very sad indeed. It’s probably a logical consequence of the fact that there is no real supreme art. The arts and crafts or decoration have always been a result of the central artistic idea.” Q: Are decorative art and fashion an expression of a respective mandatory artistic idea? “If you just look at baroque, rococo or the fashions of those eras, then I wonder: would it have been possible in the 18th or 19th century for people to consider wearing a suit and tie for a whole century? To think what kind of fashions Goethe went
Cutaways Portrait
Scene 3 of 7, 02:49 min, Quicktime H264 16Mbit, 4:3, 720x576
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Various Shots Ernst Fuchs and assistants work in the Chapel of St. Egid in Klagenfurt. Pan shots Art Car model.
Interview Ernst Fuchs Natural Sound Interview in German
Scene 4 of 7, 06:06 min, Quicktime H264 16Mbit, 4:3, 720x576
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Q: Where would you place the Art Car in the framework of your life’s work? “Theme-wise, the idea which was at the very beginning of the period which I now call “Firefox” had a very topical reference to me.” Q: Why did you use the name „Firefox “ in the late 70s? “At the time, my range had changed dramatically. It was a very special period. If I wanted to talk about its main characteristics, I would have to go back a long way. The unbroken colour is in the background and appears like a back light to a supreme light. To me, that was a revelation. This whole period lasted a long time during which I gave myself this name. “ Q: The Art Car was also created during your „Firefox“ period? “The BMW design represents the beginning of that period. To me, that was very interesting work on an object…to practise what fire and supreme light really mean.” Q: What is the connection between the BMW and the main pieces of art from the „Firefox“ period? “If you look at the whole period, you’ll realize how well it fits in there and what the connection with the pieces of art of that period is. The most remarkable main piece of work in that context is a very large painting called “Dance With Death”. It depicts a danse macabre theme in front of a sky which resembles this one here with all these flames. There are…well…a good 50 paintings of that type - important pieces of work, that is - which have a close connection with the BMW design.” Q: Does the idea of „fox and hare“ also play a part in designing the car? “My symbolism often deals with the contradiction of fox and hare. There is an important subject of mine, “Adam Mysticus”. Fox and hare meet at the precipice of the world. It’s where fox and hare say goodnight to each other – which depicts a truly deserted place. I am the firefox, and I say goodnight to the hare. That’s the incantation behind it, “May nothing like that ever happen.” Q: There is a personal experience explaining the flames on the car. “To get out of a burning car – and this has in fact happened to me – is truly a relief. In that sense, it’s an incantation which has always been used. You have to use it, so that this fate doesn’t befall you.” Q: Why does a hare jump over the flames on the Art Car? “That’s what we fear the most: you can drive as carefully and rule-abiding as you want to, but all of a sudden you have a crash. Why? Because of some deer or some hare or whatever running across the street. This can cause huge crashes. Unbelievable. This moment of surprise has been incorporated into the theme.” Q: How does your family react to the Art Car? “A few days ago, my youngest son Julian celebrated his 17th birthday. Boy, was he happy. “What a great car! You can really open everything and look inside! And the hood!” And then he saw the book which contained all the other models designed by other artists, and really passionately he said, “Dad, your BMW is the most beautiful one!” Of course, that’s a real joy.” Q: You are said to be a lover of beautiful cars. “This has always been nostalgia to me. I can remember the times when I walked through London barefoot – that was in the early 50s. I always said to myself, “If I ever have a lot of money, I’ll buy a Rolls Royce for sure.” And I did! I was amazed that the car wasn’t really as expensive as I had thought. Anyone can afford a second-hand model. Cheaper than a Mercedes-Benz. But it’s a much more beautiful car. Well, you probably shouldn’t say this too loud. Allegedly, the driving is more comfor
St. Egid Parish Church Klagenfurt, Austria
Scene 5 of 7, 02:42 min, Quicktime H264 16Mbit, 4:3, 720x576
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Outside St. Egid, Ernst Fuchs enters the chapel Inside the chapel, Ernst Fuchs explains the design of the chapel: The composition of the themes has been divided into the four directions. Eastern wall – Western Wall. They complement each other. God having become human, depicted here as the infant Jesus, as commonly pictured. In Chapter 12, it says, “A quarrel broke out in Heaven”. And the Cannibal was ejected from Heaven by Michael, the Archangel. So, that is basically the Eastern wall. It opposes the complementary Western wall, which depicts the Sacrificing of Isaac. Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are the archfathers of the chosen people. Abraham is prepared to make the sacrifice. The Western wall depicts the rejection of the human sacrifice, i.e. the end of this cult era. Thus, it makes clear that the redeeming sacrifice – Christ – will take the part of the sacrificial lamb. All in all, those are complementary images. The Southern wall is dedicated to Paradise, while the Northern wall deals with Judgment Day. The Horsemen of the Apocalypse are joined by the fighter-bombers, the shuttle, etc.” Various shots pedestrian area Klagenfurt, outside St. Egid
Dr. Cornelia Eibl - Curator Ernst Fuchs Retrospective. Natural Sound Interview in German
Scene 6 of 7, 02:27 min, Quicktime H264 16Mbit, 4:3, 720x576
 MOV Scene #6 (319 MB) H.264 Scene #6 (16 MB) Download Shotlist
Dr. Cornelia Eibl - Curator Ernst Fuchs Retrospective Natural Sound Interview in German This car is the climax of a very important cycle in his life’s work, namely the “Firefox” cycle. In the 80s, he started to flood his paintings with mighty lightning bolts. No one in art history understood that step. He actually signed some of those paintings as “Firefox”. You have seen some of them in this exhibition. The BMW is the highlight from that era. It’s a lightning bolt in itself. The interesting thing is that during the time that he painted the car, an incredible dynamic force took hold of his paintings. He had been famous for static, quiet paintings, such as the Holy Paintings or the paintings from the “Danube School” – iconic and quiet. The painting of this car gave his paintings a momentum that you can still feel today.
Studio Effects
Scene 7 of 7, 00:35 min, Quicktime H264 16Mbit, 4:3, 720x576
 MOV Scene #7 (58 MB) H.264 Scene #7 (4 MB) Download Shotlist
Effect shots E. Fuchs Art Car in the studio

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